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String Beans and Spaghetti

Here’s a simple dish based on memories of my Sicilian mother in the kitchen. I hadn’t planned on posting this recipe, so the only photo I have is of the plated pasta. However, the preparation is so straightforward that illustration might appear excessive.

My mother would often serve this dish during Lent, but also during the summer when she preferred the patio to the kitchen. Although she would French her string beans by hand, I use good-quality frozen ones.

Sometimes if they’re on hand, I’ll saute some thinly sliced scallions along with the garlic or add some toasted pine nuts to the sauteed beans.

Ingredients

2 cloves garlic minced
3 tablespoons olive oil
Crushed red pepper to taste
8 ounces French-cut string beans (I used frozen.)
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
6 ounces spaghetti or linguine broken into 1-inch pieces
Grated Pecorino Romano

Preparation

  1. Bring 6 quarts of water to a boil. When it reaches a boil, add a good amount of salt.
  2. When the water returns to a boil, place the string beans in a sieve and blanch in the water for about two minutes.
  3. When the beans are tender but still crisp, remove them in the sieve and shock in a bowl of iced water. Lift the beans from the water and set aside.
  4. Bring the water used to blanch the beans back to a boil and add the broken pasta. Cook until al dente.
  5. Meanwhile, in a wide skillet, over medium-low heat saute the garlic and crushed pepper until the garlic softens but does not get brown. Then add the drained beans to the pan and saute for two to three minutes.
  6. When the pasta is done, transfer to the skillet and toss with the beans over low heat for about a minute. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. Turn off the heat and add a generous amount of the grated cheese.
  8. Serve on warmed plates along with some grated cheese for sprinkling.

Wine Pairing: Grillo, Greco di Tuffo

 

3 thoughts on “String Beans and Spaghetti

    1. The sauce comes together when you add some of the pasta water and the off the heat with the cheese. It may be a stretch, however, to call it a “sauce.” But it is delicious.

  1. My grandkids other grandmother talks about this dish. Her parents was Sicilian and her father owned a bar and grill. This was one of his signature dishes. Only he would top his with a little tomato sauce (gravy.) I am going to try your version because it looks so good. Thanks for sharing your recipe.

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